Custody

 

I appreciate the obvious need for police officers to make enquiries and interview.

I informed the Custody Officer about my medical background. I had no medication with me and was confined to a cell for a number of hours, finger printed, photographed and subjected to giving a sample of DNA for police records.

Initially I was very confused. When I was told my arrest was as a result of enquiries by Devon & Cornwall Constabulary, it drew my thoughts away from thinking this was all about a mischievous colleague tampering with my work computer. Later, it was revealed that my lodger - house sitter had been arrested nearly two days earlier  with the same 'allegation'. 

My cell was under 24 hour video surveillance and therefore gave me no opportunity to mask any call of nature. I had soiled the incontinence pad I had on. At no point did I feel a 'vibe' of compassion from any of the officers, so did not disclose my unfortunate state. I think they must have thought I naturally 'stank to heaven'! 

Thirsty, it was only during the Police interview (some 8 hours after my arrest) was I offered a half filled plastic vending beaker of water, at a time that was nearing tea time. This was a clear breach of Custody Guidelines and duty of care by the Police requiring them to 'feed and water' me at appropriate times.

During the process of being questioned I followed the advice of the Police Duty Solicitor and I answered everything, except my name, with "No comment" (as instructed). The Inspector overseeing the enquiry did try and establish my whereabouts during the two days before. This was outside of the interview room and thankfully my solicitor intervened, as I was still too choked up. Being reminded of the Code of Conduct, the Inspector dropped his line of questions and then 'backed off'.  

It was early evening and I was parked in a side room next to the Custody Desk. I was offered at 9 pm a cup of tea, which I gratefully received. I was then informed that arrangements had been put in place for the Police Doctor to see me and he was on his way. This was nothing to do with my arthritic pain, high blood pressure or incontinence. Two hours later I was interviewed by the Police Doctor, whom frankly I struggled with interpreting his incoherent spoken words, as he had a very strong asian accent. He must have been stunned by my silence, because I did not understand him and mainly the stress of the occasion which overcame me. 2 drinks through the 14 hours of being held at a North Yorkshire Police station, in a soiled incontinence pad and completely confused about my detention.

My overall feeling was that Police Officers had pre-judged me. Months later I concluded the Police thought they had a leader of a national paedophile ring. The only 'Mr.Big' in my profile is being slightly over-weight!

During my detention I poignantly said to a Custody Officer "You've already judged me", after she gave me a leaflet, which was clearly aimed at supporting those who had perpetrated acts of indecency and sexual offences. 

I was visibly shaking, silent and showing signs of being in traumatic shock; the conclusion of the Police Doctor was a referral to the Duty Mental Health Team at the nearest North Yorkshire hospital. I knew nothing about this until I was bailed and then escorted by two Police Officers to the hospital. 

 

 

'Buggers Muddle' - term much used by the UK military in WW2. Became an accepted 'phrase', when used by Crown Court Judge Richard Lowden in February 2011 to describe a mess and the confusion caused by incompetence and/or lack of organisation; providing an unsatisfactory result and ultimately resulting the failure to recognise consequences of actions.

 

This is a personal website. Opinions expressed are from my own experience. Data is supported by written evidence. This site has been a cathartic exercise to recondition my thoughts away from ending my life. Throughout, there is no intention to defame or cause any harm to another person. There is, however, an eagerness by me to share my story and life with others, letting the public know what is happening under their noses, allowing them to judge me with all the information.